Thursday, February 19, 2009

Venue-related Questions

This Post will be for Comments and questions regarding where to sell your photos and how to get into those venues..

31 comments:

  1. I have my first showing on March 20 Can you give me some advice as to how to prepare. I am showing 8 photos on the galley walls and want to have some smaller ones for sale on the side. I have mats, backing boards and plastic bags But I am not sure how to display them.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Goldy - I don't see your URL...

    What size are your "smaller ones"? Personally, I use a black canvas rack, at the gallery. The link for it is in my book, which you have. I use a medium size for my 16x20's. You could also use something like an old wooden wine case on a stand, but.... it's worth the money to get a rack, I think. It looks professional.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oops! Just saw your link... I'll check it out.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow! I really like your images, Goldy! You're doing HDR and toning, aren't you. Nicely done. I'm thinking of doing some of that, myself. I'd love to hear how you sell at your showing. It's tough to get people to part with their money these days. Also, I've had some resistance to "Photoshopped" work. Fine art buyers are mostly purists; they want the silver halide film, hand developing and printing, and very, very, limited editions. Like 5. They want to feel this is something exclusive and not easy to do. Points for composition not withstanding.

    I really like your work- hard to pick a favorite. I think you'll do well.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I am not sure how to display my stuff. The 11x14s and the 16x20s are done in kodak metallic paper and are mounted. I dont really want to invest in frames until I see if I can sell anything. I want to just post the on the wall of the gallery as is. If they sell i can get them framed for the next show. What do you think?

    ReplyDelete
  6. BTW I do not have your book. How do I get a copy?

    ReplyDelete
  7. How are they mounted? In other words, does the image extend all the way to the edge of the mount board, or is there a border? And if there's a border, is it from the paper, or can you see the mount board under the print, at the edges?

    If it goes all the way to the edge, and you see no mount board, then that's probably OK, if you use a thicker board, especially - like a 3/16th's.

    Personally, I would mount, mat, and frame at least one of them, just to show what it would look like. You can buy a ready-made frames that are very cheap, but good quality and look great. Here's what I use:
    https://www.documounts.com/categories/display/ready_made_frames

    $26, plus tax and shipping, and it comes with everything you need - including plexiglas, cardboard backing, and hanging hardware. Personally, I'd also add a mat from here, as well. Just a single 16x20 mat with a 11x14 window. Or, if your print is exactly 11x14, I'd order it with a slightly smaller window - like 10 7/8ths x 13 7/8ths. The only small problem here is they have a $10 fee for orders under $50, so you might want to order 2. I think your work is saleable, and $50 is a good investment. If nothing else, you can give them away as gifts. =}

    Also, my book is available by clicking on the book cover in the upper right of this page, or http://ticket2ryder.com/TBP/Book.html

    ReplyDelete
  8. They are mounted on mat board not too thick, and the photo goes all the way to the edge. I can get some frames at the local Michaels. Maybe do 1 16x20 and one 11x14?

    ReplyDelete
  9. I can't stress enough how you should frame at least one 16x20 - nicely. Get a nice white rag mat with a 2 1/2 inch border - preferably double mat, or nice thick 8-ply. Sign the mat, not the print. People really don't visualize very well. Framing lets them see what it could look like on their wall. It's worth the $40 investment. Plus, you can always hang it on your wall at home. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  10. Eric,

    Looks like an intriguing blog for amateurs like myself that want to learn more about the post print aspects of photography. Your book also looks interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi Jim - I tried adding your link, but it's broken. http://www.jimruff.com ?

    ReplyDelete
  12. Eric,
    I'm just getting started, and am researching outdoor fairs and festivals in central and north Texas to start. I plan to display my framed work on a table and velcro-mounted to a back wall of a sun shelter. I'll have unframed work mounted on foam boards (with border) and 4x6 prints mounted onto the front of blank 5x7 cards in a standing, rotating rack. Any advice would be welcome.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Oh.....thanks for starting this forum!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hi Tom - Can you post a link with some of your work? I haven't done the Fair circuit, though I've been tempted. I think pricing is the big thing here. And will you have the smaller prints in clear bags?

    ReplyDelete
  15. I now have my first physical portfolio completed of nature photography prints. 13 x 19 color prints on rag paper. I also have a website, Nature's Light Photography, NLPhoto.Zenfolio.com.

    I have had zero luck finding galleries. Out of five emails, none have even responded. Can anyone please review my work and give advice how to find galleries, and how to approach them (I'm actually confident in this manner).

    Thank you,

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hate to say it, but you probably need to GO to the gallery in person. That's what I did, and I've been in a nice gallery for over two years. Get a busniess card - one with one of your images on the front and contact info on the back. Vistaprint.com is one place that will do these for you. Spend $40 for 250. Go to the galleries and talk to the owner; give them your card. Go low-key; low pressure. Just say you're "looking to hang", but don't ask them. Just give the card and let them contact you if they like your work. That's what I did. I have other tips in my book, but that's a good start for you. Good luck!!!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Eric, thank you.

    I do have a business card in addition to my paper portfolio. Are you suggesting that I leave the portfolio at home? Given the responses I get showing it, the porfolio shows well and I am making sales to individuals when they see it.

    In the Midwest there appears to be a great loss of gallaries. A loss to the artists as well as communities. Are you aware of any national associations that galleries belong to that would provide galery contact information?

    I was so excited to see your forum that I quickly wrote out my first question and rudely omitted my name. My name is Nathan a.k.a. annonomous, my apology.

    I think you have a grand idea with your website and wish yhou the best of luck with it. Surely appears to be a win-win in my opinion.

    Best, Nathan

    ReplyDelete
  18. Hi Nathan! Thanks for the name. =}

    No, I wouldn;t leave the portfolio at home - just in the car, perhaps. Better yet, do what I do; I have an Apple iPod Touch which I have loaded resized images of my work onto. It's great to just pullthat out and finger flick from one picture to the next, and even zoom in a bit with your fingers.

    My only advice is to not do a hard-sell, as these gallery owners are there to sell their work, mainly. Let them know up front that you like their work and their gallery, and that you're a photographer yourself, and are considering taking it to the next level and hanging in a gallery. Say you'd be delighted if he/she could take a look at your work when they have a minute, and give them your card, (which shows your work on it). If they like the card, you have an opening to whip out your Touch - or whatever little device you have that has a decent sized screen, like the Touch/iPhone - and show them a couple others. Most people like looking at pictures on gadgets, I find - but don't take too much of their time. Just a quick look and tell them you don't want to take up too much of their time, but if they do get a minute, to please have a look at your site and let you know if they think your work is marketable. You're not asking to hang in their gallery. Let them come to you. If, like what happenned to me, they say, "Great stuff; I think you'll do well". Then ask if they have a small space to hang just 2 or 3 of your pieces, as a trial run. (I brought 3 in and the owner wanted more immediately; I brought in 8 and he hung them all - right away!).

    As for contacting galleries... I've contacting a bunch of galleries that exhibit photography. Not that many do, it seems. Galleries tend to only let you hang for a few months, until your "show" is over. Then you move on to the next show. Assuming you can find one. You want to find a gallery which is more of a "store" - where the owner is a photographer selling their work and a few other peoples work. Typically in a tourist area. Maybe going to the store would be better than email/phone, but if that's not possible, email/phone is worth a try - especially if you have nice work that complements the gallery owners style and fits the area. Like selling images of NYC in a Manhatten gift store/"art gallery" in a touristy area.
    Anyway, I hope this helps.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I have decided to take your advice and frame 2 or 3 of my pieces before doing the show. I can get 16x20 frames matted to 11x14 at Michaels for $18.00 and I can get the 16x20s matted (2.5") and framed there for around $40.00. Basic black frames white matts. I think they will have more visual impact.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Good day Eric,

    Thank you for your advice. It sounds sound to me.

    Best regrds, Nathan

    ReplyDelete
  21. Eric, Thanks for trying to link to my website. It should be OK again. That's www.jimruff.com

    I bought your book and it has many useful hints and techniques.

    Best regards, Jim

    ReplyDelete
  22. I visited your site - really nice work, Jim!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi, How you (specifically) find your clients and develop your business? Do you live exclusively from imaging or you have a job ?

    ReplyDelete
  24. I have a "Real" job, but I make a nice amount from selling my work. I handed out a lot of business cards and visisted a lot of galleries. I got lucky and met someone who intriduced me to someone else who went to my site and then asked me if I was interested in selling my work in their place of business. they bought a few framed pieces and a bunch of 16x20's and 8x10's. When I got the call to bring my "samples" in, I was in a panic.

    The reason for this blog - and my book, of course - is to help others when they hit that point. I made BIG mistakes that cost me literally thousands. Bad frame decisions and bad mounting and matting and titling and signature and measuring and on and on.

    I'll say this, though; once I got started, and had a good looking product to sell, (it's not just the image - the presentation is critical) - then it took off all by itself. I'm in a gallery and a few places around where I live - Inn's and B&B's kind of thing. If you really want the full story, buty the eBook - not cuz I'm trying to make money, (its not much, trust me), but there's a lot there that will easily pay for the lousy $12, probably 100 times over. At least it would have for me, if I had that info back-when. Or, just hang out here and ask away. No big deal.

    ReplyDelete
  25. My second show is this evening. Although I did not sell anything in the March show, I was invited back for this one. Everything is now framed and looks really professional. I will let you know how it goes tonight.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Hi Eric
    This is a pretty basic question. Can you please tell me how to find out about the venues that show amateur work?

    ReplyDelete
  27. Google. =} Check your local events calendar. Ask at galleries, perhaps. Check local artist groups/associations. Also, libraries often shocase local artists work. You have to submit your work and they'll choose from several artists/photographers. Often they have a rotating thing, where they showcase one artist a month. Try local photography groups. too - online and also through local studios.

    ReplyDelete